Huffington Post settles Lachaux libel claim

Recently we reported that the Supreme Court had granted The Independent permission to appeal the decision in the Lachaux v Independent Print Ltd [2017] EWCA Civ 1334.  The case concerns the “serious harm” threshold for bringing a defamation claim and is unarguably the most important defamation decision since the inception of the Defamation Act 2013.  Much has been said about the law, but behind every landmark case is at least one aggrieved party.  Today the second defendant The Huffington Post’s publishers Oath (UK) Ltd joined with the Claimant in making a statement in open court accepting that the defamatory allegations it had published were untrue.

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Defamation take-down requests to Google

The Right to be Forgotten has been in the news again recently following the decision in NT1 & NT2 v Google LLC [2018] EWHC 799 (QB) (read our blog on that decision here), but Google will often voluntarily remove content from its search engine results on a variety of other grounds, including that the content is defamatory.

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Martin Lewis to sue Facebook

Martin Lewis, the consumer campaigner, has announced that he intends to issue defamation proceedings against Facebook in respect of misleading advertisements bearing his name that have been published on the social media platform. It is claimed that many of the adverts show Martin Lewis’ face next to endorsements that he has not made.  These include adverts for binary trading schemes that are viewed as scams by the Financial Conduct Authority.

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NT1 and NT2 v Google Inc: How to seek the delisting of search engine results following the first English decision on the “right to be forgotten”

The much-anticipated decision in NT 1 & NT 2 v Google LLC [2018] EWHC 799 (QB) was handed down on 13 April 2018.  The joint judgment in two separate claims against Google, is the first time the English courts have had to rule on the application of the ‘right to be forgotten’ principle following the decision in Google Spain SL, Google Inc. v Agencia Espanola de Proteccion de Datos (AEPD) and Mario Costeja Gonzalez (Case C-131/12).

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Alex Cochrane joins Brett Wilson LLP

Brett Wilson LLP is pleased to announce the arrival of Alex Cochrane in the firm’s media law department.

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Supreme Court to hear appeal on “serious harm” threshold in defamation cases

The Supreme Court has granted the unsuccessful defendants in Lachaux v Independent Print Ltd [2017] EWCA Civ 1327 permission to appeal against the Court of Appeal’s rulings regarding the application of section 1(1) of the Defamation Act 2013.

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Max Campbell becomes a partner of Brett Wilson LLP

Brett Wilson LLP is delighted to announce that Max Campbell is now a partner of the firm.

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Forthcoming ‘right to be forgotten’ cases and the interplay with the GDPR

With a number of high-profile claims against Google in the offing, practitioners and individuals alike are hopeful for guidance on the interplay between the application of the ‘right to be forgotten’ principle and the forthcoming introduction of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).
Iain Wilson, managing partner of Brett Wilson LLP, considers the issues at hand.

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Leveson 2 and section 40 scrapped: government succumb to the power of the press

Part 2 of the Leveson Inquiry (colloquially referred to as ‘Leveson 2’) which had been intended to address ‘the extent of unlawful or improper conduct within News International and other media organisations’ has been formally canned by the Government.  Section 40 of the Crime and Courts Act 2013, which, had it ever come into force, would have made news publishers who were not subject to a Government-approved regulator, liable for the costs of defamation, privacy, and harassment claims, regardless of whether they won or lost, will now be repealed at the earliest opportunity.

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