020 7183 8950 | info@brettwilson.co.uk

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Cyberbullying and Trolling Solicitors

The Internet has made a publisher of the man on the Clapham Omnibus and the rise of social media has opened up communication across the globe.  Unfortunately, some people use these platforms as means of inciting unwanted, often circular, arguments, launching repeated baseless attacks and monitoring people’s activity without their consent.  Those who behave abusively online are referred to as internet trolls, and examples of ‘trolling’ include: -

  • Posting repeated ‘comments’ on message boards or news articles, attacking someone’s
    character and/or invading their privacy, or designed to provoke argument
  • Repeatedly sending abusive or otherwise upsetting Tweets
  • ‘Following’ a person into online chatrooms or Facebook in order to interrupt conversations
    and invade their privacy

Trolls or cyber bullys sometimes labour under the misapprehension that they can say and do what they want online.  Alternatively, they may take the view that they can get away with it (perhaps by disguising their identity).

Everyone has a right to enjoy what this world has to offer without fear of attack – and that extends to the World Wide Web.  Under the law of England and Wales, any course of conduct (two or more incidents) designed to cause a person alarm or distress, or where the perpetrator ought to know that is the likely outcome, is harassment.  It is a defence for the perpetrator to show that their conduct was reasonable, but with ‘trolling’ this will rarely be the case. 

Harassment is a criminal offence contrary to the Protection from Harassment Act 1997 and punishable by up to six months’ imprisonment.  Victims should consider whether they wish to
make a report to the Police.   Unfortunately, however, the Police are often overstretched and
under-resourced, and online crime of this nature is sometimes not seen as a priority.  In those circumstances you may want to take civil action against the person concerned. 

Our cyberbullying and trolling solicitors can help you by: -

  • Writing a Letter of Claim, or ‘cease and desist’ letter, to the person responsible
  • Issuing a Claim for harassment
  • Securing an interim or post-Judgment injunction prohibiting the behaviour complained of
  • Persuading third parties such as website operators or hosts to remove offending material
  • Making representations (where appropriate) to the Police or Crown Prosecution Service
    that an investigation or prosecution should be commenced

We may be able to help you even where the perpetrator is anonymous – see our page on Norwich Pharmacol Orders

What to do if you are being trolled

1. Do not engage with a troll or retaliate.  The common mantra "do not feed the trolls" is good advice.  If you do not take the bait, they may eventually lose interest.  If you have already engaged with a troll then simply make it clear, on one occasion, that you want them to stop what they are doing.  Do not get drawn into dialogue about this.

2. Keep a record of the trolling.  Print off relevant webpages ensuring they are dated.

3. Consider making a complaint to the police.  You should certainly do this if you believe you or anyone else is in danger.

4. If the harassment is ongoing and you feel you need to take legal action contact us.

We offer fixed-fee preliminary consultations.  A consultation will help you understand the legal and practical issues relating to your case and allow you to make an informed decision about what action to take. 

To arrange a consultation or to find out how we can support you, please send us an emailcomplete our online enquiry form or call us on 020 7183 8950.

Please note that we do not undertake civil litigation on a legal aid basis.  Information on legal aid can be found at the Government’s benefits and credits website by clicking here.