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Brett Wilson Criminal and Regulatory Law blog

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21.06.19

Solicitor struck off for “deliberately and excessively” overcharging clients

Solicitor Keith Smart has been struck off the roll by the Solicitors Disciplinary Tribunal (‘SDT’) after a finding that he had ‘deliberately and excessively’ overcharged his clients and failed to follow the regulator’s accounting procedures. The Solicitors Regulatory Authority (‘SRA’) had cause to investigate Mr Smart (who was working as a sole practitioner and COLP…

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18.06.19

Man who threw milkshake over Nigel Farage ordered to pay compensation

A man who threw a milkshake over Nigel Farage has received a 12 month Community Order plus 150 hours unpaid work.  He was also ordered to pay Mr Farage £350 in compensation to cover the cost of cleaning of the suit and damage to a lapel microphone. The incident took place during a walkabout on…

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Solicitor sanctioned for inadvertently aiding fraudulent football club bid

Richard Quinn of Riley Hayes Solicitors has been fined £5,000 by the Solicitors’ Disciplinary Tribunal (‘SDT’) for making reckless misrepresentations in a letter utilised in a fraudulent bid to purchase Hartlepool United Football Club (‘HUFC’). The investigation into Mr Quinn’s conduct followed the conviction of ‘Mr M’, a business man and former director of Swindon…

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Solicitor struck off the roll for “effectively stealing” from counsel and experts

A sole practioner and solicitor since 1998 has been struck off the roll by the Solicitors Disciplinary Tribunal (‘SDT’) having retained funds owed to experts and counsel, over a number of years. The Solicitors Regulatory Authority (‘SRA’) investigated Martyn Brown after questions were raised following the filing of a Qualified Accountant’s Reports.  An inspection was…

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24.05.19

Gang members convicted in landmark ‘county lines’ human trafficking case

Three convicted young drug dealers, who were separately prosecuted for human trafficking offences under the Modern Slavery Act 2015, have been sentenced to between 3 and a half and 5 years’ imprisonment. The gang members, Glodi Wabelua, Dean Alford and Michael Karemera (all 25 years old)  had been convicted after a trial in February 2016…

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15.05.19

Career opportunities at Brett Wilson LLP

The firm is expanding.  We are presently recruiting a solicitor and a paralegal in our media law department.  In our civil, regulatory and white collar-crime department, we are recruiting a civil litigation solicitor and a paralegal/trainee solicitor.  Full details of the role and how to apply can be found at our Careers page.

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Police request access to complainants’ data: A form in a teacup?

A new standard police form requesting agreement to access complainants’ phone data has caused controversy. The not-very-snappily-titled ‘NPCC Final Consent v-1-2’ form is designed to achieve a consistent system for accessing the electronic devices of victims and witnesses. A copy is available here. This can only be done with that person’s consent. As such, the…

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13.05.19

Is it time to stop talking about gagging clauses?

The Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA) has announced it has referred a solicitor from magic circle firm Allen & Overy to the Solicitors Disciplinary Tribunal over drawing-up a Non-Disclosure Agreement (NDA) on behalf of film Producer Harvey Weinstein.  It is understood the agreement, in essence, paid Mr Weinstein’s former assistant Zelda Perkins a large sum in…

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29.03.19

Twitter and the Malicious Communications Act 1988

Two people have been arrested by South Yorkshire Police on suspicion of sending ‘malicious communications’ following a series of tweets to five MPs. The tweets were directed at Independent Group MPs Anna Soubry, Chuka Umunna, Angela Smith and Sarah Wollaston, and Labour MP David Lammy. It is alleged that one of the individuals posted an…

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21.03.19

The Criminal Caution: Can it still be relied on?

“You do not have to say anything. But it may harm your defence if you fail to mention when questioned something which you later rely on in court. Anything you do say may be given in evidence” Anyone questioned as a suspect of a criminal offence in England and Wales should hear and understand this…

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Articles are intended as an introduction to the topic and do not constitute legal advice.

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