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18.06.19

Man who threw milkshake over Nigel Farage ordered to pay compensation

A man who threw a milkshake over Nigel Farage has received a 12 month Community Order plus 150 hours unpaid work.  He was also ordered to pay Mr Farage £350 in compensation to cover the cost of cleaning of the suit and damage to a lapel microphone.

The incident took place during a walkabout on 20 May 2019 by Mr Farage in Newcastle upon Tyne.  Paul Crowther was filmed throwing a milkshake over Mr Farage and told journalists at the scene that the act was “a right of protest against people like him...the bile and racism he spouts out in this country is far more damaging than a bit of milkshake to his front”.

Paul Crowther admitted the charges of common assault and criminal damage.  Defending Crowther, Brian Hegarty stated that the actions were a ‘moment of madness’ that would ordinarily be dealt with by means of a police caution.  Mr Crowther has since lost his job as a result of the charges.

Mr Farage stated to the Police that he was “concerned because of the behaviour of individuals like this, the normal democratic process cannot continue in a lawful and peaceful manner’.

Chris Atkinson from the Crown Prosecution Service said: “In an open democracy, people should be free to conduct legitimate political campaigns without fear of physical assault.

“While members of the public have the democratic right to engage in peaceful protest, it is wholly appropriate to bring charges in any case where such protests cross the line into criminal behaviour...In this case, the significant volume of video material has enabled the CPS to build a very robust case against Paul Crowther and we would hope that this acts as a deterrent to others considering any criminal form of political protest.”

 

Click here to find out how Brett Wilson LLP's specialist criminal defence team can help you if you are facing a criminal investigation or proceedings.


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